2021 Canadian federal election

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The 2021 Canadian federal election (formally the 44th Canadian general election) took place on September 20, 2021, to elect members of the House of Commons to the 44th Canadian Parliament. The writs of election were issued by Governor General Mary May Simon on August 15, 2021, when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau requested the dissolution of parliament for a snap election.[2]

Though Trudeau's Liberals were hoping to win a majority government to govern alone, the results were mostly unchanged from the 2019 Canadian federal election, in which the Liberals also lost the popular vote but won the most seats.[3] The Liberals won the most seats at 159;[b] as this falls short of the 170 seats needed for a majority in the House of Commons, the Liberals are expected to form a minority government with support from other parties.[4][5] The Conservatives, led by Erin O'Toole, maintained 119[b] seats and will continue as the Official Opposition. The Bloc Québécois, led by Yves-François Blanchet, won 33[b] seats. The New Democratic Party, led by Jagmeet Singh, won 25[b] seats. The Green Party maintained 2[b] seats but party leader Annamie Paul was defeated for the third[c] time in her riding of Toronto Centre where she placed fourth; the party lost both voters and its percentage of the popular vote to 394,000 votes nationally and 2.3% share of the vote.[6][7][8] The People's Party did not win any seats, as party leader Maxime Bernier was defeated for the second time[d] in his riding of Beauce; however, they received more than 842,000 votes nationally, or just below 5% share of the vote.[6]